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The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
RESEARCH NETWORK ON SUCCESSFUL MIDLIFE DEVELOPMENT


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Biographies

MIDMAC Members:
Brim Baltes Bumpass Cleary Featherman Hazzard Kessler
Lachman Markus Marmot Rossi Ryff Shweder

PROJECT Officer:
Laurie R. Garduque

MIDMAC Associates



Dr. Orville Gilbert Brim - Social Psychology
Tel: 203-637-5589
midmac1@aol.com

President of Life Trends, Inc., and Director of The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Midlife Development, Vero Beach, Florida. Dr. Brim is the author and editor of a dozen books on human development. He is the former president of both the Russell Sage Foundation and the Foundation for Child Development. His research focuses on life span development, particularly on constancy and change in personality from childhood through old age. His most recent work was on the maintenance of ambition after success and failure. Currently he is writing about the origins of the desire for fame and its transformations during middle age.  This work in progress is known as The Fame Motive.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Brim, G. (1992). Ambition: How we manage success and failure throughout our lives.
          New York, Basic Books.
Brim, G., & Kagan, J. (Eds.). (1980). Constancy and Change in Human Development.
Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
Brim, G., & Baltes, P. B. (Eds.). (1979-1984). Life-Span Development and Behavior
(Vols. II-VI). New York: Academic Press.

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Dr. Paul B. Baltes - Personality Psychology
Max Planck Institute for Human Development
Lentzeallee 94, D-14195 Berlin, Germany
Tel: 011 49 30 824-06256 or 255
 baltes@mpib-berlin.mpg.de

Co-Director of the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, in Berlin, and Professor of Psychology at the Free University of Berlin. Dr. Baltes is interested in the life-span study of the mind with a particular focus on adulthood and old age. His current research program has three main components. In the first, Dr. Baltes and his colleagues explore age-related limits of cognitive functioning and latent reserves in the area of memory and other components of basic intelligence, by means of cognitive intervention research. The second is on the development of bodies of knowledge that reflect the special strengths of adulthood such as wisdom. The third concerns behavioral and self-related strategies of successful development during midlife and old age.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Baltes, P. B. (1993). The aging mind: Potential and limits. Gerontologist, 33, 580-594.
Baltes, P. B., & Staudinger, U. M. (1993). The search for a psychology of wisdom. Current
Directions in Psychological Science 2, 75-80.

Baltes, P. B. (1991). The many faces of human aging: Toward a psychological culture of old age.              Psychological Medicine, 21, 837-854.
Baltes, P. B., & Baltes, M. M. (Eds.). (1990). Successful aging: Perspectives from the
          behavioral sciences. New York: Cambridge University Press.

Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
The Center for Psychology at Max Planck Institute for Human Development, Berlin, which is staffed by about 25 full-time scientists and support personnel, sponsors or co-sponsors several laboratories of the Institute (about 150 total staff) in which psychological research on life-span human development is conducted.
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Dr. Larry L. Bumpass - Demography
Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
4412 Social Science Building, 1180 Observatory Drive Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1393
Tel: 608-262-2182
 bumpass@ssc.wisc.edu

Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Bumpass is past President, Population Association of America, and co-director of the National Survey of Families and Households. His work is on the social demography of family transitions and family living arrangements including: patterns of cohabitation, marriage, contraceptive behavior, fertility, marital disruption, and remarriage. A second theme concerns the interrelationships among these family experiences and other life course events such as educational attainments and family work patterns. The third major perspective in his work is a concern with cross-cultural comparisons of changing family patterns.

<>Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Bumpass, L. L (1990). What's happening to the family?: Interactions between demographic
          and institutional change. Demography, 27, 483-498.
Bumpass, L. L., & Sweet, J. (1992). Family experiences across the life course: Differences
by cohort, education, and race/ethnicity. Proceedings, The Peopling of the Americas,
3, 313-350, International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP).
Bumpass, L. L. (1994). A comparative analysis of coresidence and contact with parents in
Japan and the United States. In Cho, L. J., & Yada, M. (Eds.). Tradition and change
in the Asian family. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.


Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
Center for Demography and Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. This interdisciplinary faculty research center for demographic studies provides facilities and staff for a community of researchers examining population processes and life course issues.
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Dr. Paul D. Cleary - Medical Sociology
Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School
180 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts  02115
Tel: 617-432-0174
cleary@hcp.med.harvard.edu

Professor, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Cleary is a medical sociologist interested in health behavior, patient assessments of health care quality, measurement of quality of life, and relationships between clinician and organizational characteristics and the quality of medical care. In his current studies, he is investigating health related quality of life in a probability sample of US adults, how organizational characteristics affect access to, and the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS, and variations in treatment patterns and outcomes of persons over the age of 65 who have been hospitalized for an acute myocardial infarction. He also is Principal Investigator of one of the centers recently funded by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research as part of the Consumer Assessment of Health plans (CAHPS) study to develop survey protocols for collecting information from consumers regarding their health plans and services.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Cleary,  P.D., Van Devanter, N., Steilen, M., Stuart, A., Shipton-Levy, R., McMullen,
W., Theresa, R.F., Singer, E., Avorn, J., Pindyck, J., (1995). A randomized trial
of an education and support  program for HIV-infected individuals. AIDS, 9,
1271-1278.
Guadagnoli, E.,  Hauptman, P.J., Ayanian, J.Z., Pashos, C.L., McNeil, B.J., Cleary, P.D.,
(1995). Variations in the use of cardiac procedures after acute myocardial infarction.
New England Journal of Medicine, 333(9), 573-578.
Wilson, I.B., Cleary, P.D., (1995). Linking clinical variables with health-related quality of
life: conceptual model of patient outcomes. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical
Association, 273(1), 59-65.

Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
The Department of Health Care Policy has an interdisciplinary team of scientists, including sociologists, psychologists, economists, statisticians, and clinicians. They are experienced in study design and the development, design, and administration of surveys in community populations as well as hospitalized and ambulatory patients.
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Dr. David L. Featherman - Sociology
Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan
426 Thompson Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan  48106-1248
Tel: 734-764-8364
 feathrmn@isr.umich.edu

Director, Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. Former President, Social Science Research Council, New York. Dr. Featherman's current research is on the individual, interpersonal and organizational influences that promote work careers of sustained high productivity and socially acknowledged distinction beyond midlife. At the center of this broad inquiry is a specific interest in job-related expertise -- on how it is acquired, elaborated, maintained, and restored throughout the entire worklife.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Featherman, D. L., & Petersen, T. (1986). Markers of aging: Modeling the clocks that
          time us. Research on Aging, 8(3), 339-365.
Featherman, D. L., & Marks, N. (1990). Human development and society: A
          transactional relationship. Human Development, 33, 171-178.

Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
The Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, is one of the largest survey research institutions in the world. Researchers from a number of disciplines provide the expertise to design and conduct a wide range of projects relevant to major public policy issues, and to ensure the scientific validity of their results. The ISR staff includes over 100 Ph.D. scientists and a national field staff of over 300 interviewers.
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Dr. William R. Hazzard - Medicine
The Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Wake Forest University
Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, North Carolina  27157-1207
Tel: 336-713-8585
 whazzard@wfubmc.edu

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Internal Medicine and Director of the J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University. Dr. Hazzard works to assure continuity between studies of the aging process in midlife and that in old age, especially as related to the precursors of disease and disability in old age amenable to preventive intervention before old age. He has concentrated upon the hormonal bases of the chronic diseases of middle and old age, notably coronary heart disease and its modulation by sex steroid hormone secretion and, in postmenopausal women, hormone replacement therapy.

<>Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Hazzard, W. R. (1986). Biological basis of the sex differential in longevity. Journal of the
           American Geriatrics Society, 34, 455-471.

Hazzard, W. R., Haffner, S. M., Kushwaha, R. S., Applebaum-Bowden, D., & Foster,
D. M.
            (1984). Preliminary report: Kinetic studies on the modulation of high-density
lipoprotein,
            apolipoprotein, and subfraction metabolism by sex steroids in a
postmenopausal woman.
            Metabolism, 33, 779-784.
Hazzard, W. R. (1983). Preventive gerontology: Strategies for healthy aging. Postgraduate
            Medicine, 74, 279-287.


Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:

Department of Internal Medicine, the Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University. This department and the Bowman Gray School of Medicine in general, notably under the umbrella of the J. Paul Sticht Center on Aging, is focusing upon preventive interventions that will delay until advanced old age the onset of clinical diseases such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, and arthritis.
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Dr. Ronald C. Kessler - Medical Sociology
Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School
180 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts  02115
Tel: 617-432-3587
kessler@hcp.med.harvard.edu

Professor, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Kessler's research is concerned with the relationship between stressful life experiences and mental health. He has been involved in a series of studies of high risk stress situations, including studies of job loss, widowhood, caregiving for a mentally ill relative, and exposure to the AIDS virus. He has also been involved in studies of chronic role-related stress. His current work is concerned with gene-environment interactions in the relationship between stressful life events and mental illness, and the analytic epidemiology of comorbid psychiatric disorders.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Kessler, R. C., & Magee, W. J. (1994). Childhood family violence and adult recurrent
depression. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 35, 13-27.
Kessler, R. C., McGonagle, K. A., Nelson, C. B., Hughes, M., Swartz, M., & Blazer,
D. G.(1994). Sex and depression in the National Comorbidity Survey II: Cohort
effects. Journal of Affective Disorders, 30, 15-26.
Kessler, R. C., McGonagle, K. A., Zhao, S., Nelson, C. B., Hughes, M., Eshleman, S.,
Wittchen, H. U., & Kendler, K. S. (1994). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence of
DSM-III-R psychiatric disorders in the United States: Results from the National
Comorbidity Survey. Archives of General Psychiatry, 51, 413-420.


Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
The Department of Health Care Policy has an interdisciplinary team of scientists, including sociologists, psychologists, economists, statisticians, and clinicians. They are experienced in study design and the development, design, and administration of surveys in community populations as well as hospitalized and ambulatory patients.
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Dr. Margie E. Lachman - Personality Psychology
Department of Psychology, MS#062, Brandeis University
415 South Street, Waltham, Massachusetts  02454-9110
Tel: 781-736-3255
lachman@brandeis.edu

Professor of Psychology, Brandeis University. Dr. Lachman's research focuses on personality and cognitive development in adulthood and old age. She is currently involved in research on the developmental course of personal control and its relationship with physical and mental health. One of her experimental studies uses a cognitive-behavioral intervention to examine how self-efficacy, attributions, and control beliefs are related to changes in physical behavior (exercise) and cognitive functioning (memory) during midlife and old age.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Lachman, M. E, James, J. B. (Eds.) (1997). Multiple Paths of Midlife Development.
           Chicago:  The University of Chicago Press.
Lachman, M. E, Lewkowicz, C., Marcus, A., & Peng, Y. (in press). Images of midlife
          development by young, middle-aged and elderly adults. Journal of Adult
          Development.
Lachman, M. E. (Ed.). (1993). Planning and control processes across the life span. East
          Sussex, Lawrence Erlbaum. [Also published as a special issue of the International
          Journal of Behavioral Development (1993).]
Lachman, M. E., Weaver, S. L., Bandura, M., Elliott, E., & Lewkowicz, C. (1992).
Improving memory and control beliefs through cognitive restructuring and
self-generated strategies. Journals of Gerontology, Psychological Sciences, 47,
293-299.


Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
Life-Span Developmental Psychology Laboratory, Brandeis University. In this research laboratory the focus is on personality and cognitive development in adulthood and old age. The laboratory is staffed by several post-doctoral researchers, one Master's level research associate, and several graduate and undergraduate students. It maintains a comprehensive file of personality tests.
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Dr. Hazel Rose Markus - Social Psychology
Department of Psychology, Stanford University
420 Jordan Hall, Room 256, Stanford, California  94305
Tel: 650-723-4404
 hmarkus@psych.stanford.edu

Professor of Psychology at Stanford University. Dr. Markus' research is on the role of the self-concept and self-esteem in one's own behavior and in the perception and understanding of others. She has been continually concerned with the role of the sociocultural environment and one's position within it in shaping the self and personality. Dr. Markus is currently directing, with colleagues at the University of Michigan, a study on the role of the self-concept -- present, past and possible -- in adulthood.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Markus, H., & Kitayama, S. (1991). Culture and the self: Implications for cognition,
          emotion, and motivation. Psychological Review, 98, 224-253.
Markus, H., & Herzog, A. R. (1991). The role of the self-concept in aging. In Schaie, K.
          W., & Lawton, M. P. (Eds.). Annual review of gerontology and geriatrics. 11, pp.
          110-143. New York: Springer.
Markus, H., & Cross, S. (1991). Possible selves across the life span. Human Development,
34, 230-255.


Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:

The Department of Psychology at Stanford University includes separate laboratories in social, developmental, personality, cognitive, and neuroscience approaches for the study of behavior. It is a center for the development of theory and research in cognitive functioning from infancy through older adulthood.
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Professor Sir Michael G. Marmot - Medicine
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London Medical School
1-19 Torrington Place, London WCIE 6BT, England
Tel: 011 44 171 391-1717
 michael@public-health.ucl.ac.uk

Professor and Chairman of the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at University College London, and Director of the recently launched International Centre for Health and Society. Professor Marmot heads an active epidemiology research program on social and cultural determinants of health and ill-health. His work on cardiovascular disease has led to strategies of prevention and health policy. He is director of three large current interdisciplinary research programs: a longitudinal study of 10,308 civil servants; a study of patterns of disease among immigrants to Britain; and a study of 17,000 adults to monitor the nation's cardiovascular health.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Marmot, M. G. (1994, Fall). Social differentials in health within and between populations.
          Daedalus, Health and Wealth," 123,(4), 197-215. World Health Organization,
          Geneva (1994). Cardiovascular disease risk factors: New areas for research.
Marmot M. G., Scientific Group, M. G. Marmot, Chair McKeigue P. M., Miller, G. J., &
          Marmot, M. J. (1989).  Coronary heart disease in south Asians overseas: A review.
          Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 42,7, 597-609.
Marmot, M. G., & Davey Smith, G. (1989). Why are the Japanese living longer? British
           Medical Journal, 299, 1547-1551.

Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health and International Centre for Health and Society, University College, London, England. The research teams consist of medical epidemiologists, statisticians, psychiatrists, nutritionists, social scientists, and computer programmers. In December, 1994, the International Centre for Health and Society was launched. This is an interdisciplinary research center for positive health, with other academic departments from the University of London.
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Dr. Alice S. Rossi - Sociology
34 Stagecoach Road, Amherst Massachusetts  01002-3527
Tel: 413-256-0308
 asr@sadri.umass.edu

Harriet Martineau Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of Massachusetts (Amherst). Dr. Rossi has held appointments at the Johns Hopkins University, the University of Chicago, and Harvard University, and is former president of the American Sociological Association. Her research interests and publications have focused on sex and gender roles, family and kinship, women in politics, intergenerational relations, and biosocial science. Her recent major study was a five-year project on parent-adult child relationships in a life course framework.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Rossi, A. S. (Ed.) (1994). Sexuality Across the Life Course. Chicago: The University of
          Chicago Press.
Rossi, A. S. (1993). The future in the making: Recent trends in the work/family
          interface. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 63, 166-76.
Rossi, A. S., & Rossi, P. H. (1990). Of human bonding: Parent-child relations across the
          life course. Hawthorne, NY: Aldine de Gruyter.

Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
Social and Demographic Research Institute, University of Massachusetts. Established to facilitate the research of graduate students and faculty. Suite of 20 offices for all faculty working on funded research, graduate students serve as research assistants, postdoctoral fellows and SADRI support personnel.
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Dr. Carol D. Ryff - Social Psychology
Institute on Aging, University of Wisconsin
2245 MSC, 1300 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin  53706
Tel: 608-262-4855
 ryff@ssc.wisc.edu

Professor of Psychology and Acting Director of the Institute on Aging at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr. Ryff studies psychological well-being across the adult life course. Her interest is in how various dimensions of positive functioning (e.g., self-acceptance, environmental mastery, autonomy, positive relations with others, personal growth, purpose in life) change as people age, and as they go through particular life transitions or life experiences (e.g., parenthood, community relocation, work achievements). Her program of research also addresses how broad social structural factors, such as class, culture, and gender, affect the experience of well-being.

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Ryff, C. D., & Seltzer, M. M. (Eds.) 1996. The Parental Experience in Midlife.
Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Ryff, C. D., & Keyes, C. L. M. (in press). The structure of psychological well-being
           revisited. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
Ryff, C. D., & Essex, M. J. (1991). Psychological well-being in middle and later adulthood:
Descriptive markers and explanatory processes. In Schaie, K. W., & Lawton, M. P.
(Eds.), Annual review of gerontology and geriatrics, 11, pp. 144-171. New York:
Springer.
Ryff, C. D. (1989). Happiness is everything, or is it?: Explorations on the meaning of
          psychological well-being. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 57,
          1069-1081.

Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:
The Institute on Aging and Adult Life is an interdisciplinary research and graduate training unit within the Graduate School and the Medical School at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Its main function is to encourage and coordinate campus-wide efforts to promote innovative interdisciplinary research about aging and the adult lifecourse. The Institute administers clinical research in behavioral medicine, basic studies of biological aging, historical and socio-demographic research, and behavioral research on cognitive functioning and optimal aging.
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Dr. Richard A. Shweder - Anthropology
Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago
5730 South Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois  60637
Tel: 773-702-1524
rshd@midway.uchicago.edu

Professor of Human Development and Chairman of the Committee on Human Development at the University of Chicago. Dr. Shweder's areas of expertise include cross-cultural human development, culture theory, comparative ethics and cultural psychology. In recent years he has undertaken comparative moral development research in India and the United States, with special attention to family life and social practices (e.g., arranged marriage, no divorce, care of dependent parents, health maintenance) on the East Coast of India. He has been examining the questions, "What is universal, what is culture specific and what develops in moral codes?"

Selected Key References Related to Research Interest:
Shweder, R. A. (Ed.) (1998). Welcome to Middle Age (And Other Cultural Fictions).
          Chicago:
The University of Chicago Press.
Shweder, R. A. 'Why do men barbecue?' and other essays in cultural
          psychology. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
Shweder, R. A., & Sullivan, M. A. (1992). Cultural psychology: Who needs it? Annual
Review of Psychology, 44, 497-523.
Shweder, R. A. (1991). Thinking through cultures: Expeditions in cultural psychology.
Cambridge: Harvard University Press.


Major Worksites and Research Laboratories:

Committee on Human Development, University of Chicago. Founded in 1940, an interdisciplinary social science graduate program and research center. The faculty consists of anthropologists, biologists, psychologists, sociologists, and political scientists who have a focus on life-span development, personality processes, and cross-cultural studies. Also, in Orissa, India, since 1968, Dr. Shweder has been carrying out field research in the Hindu temple town of Bhubaneswar.
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